Review: The Sorting Room

Written and directed by Ben Stahl, The Sorting Room is set in the future, where world peace has been achieved. The only downside is the global population has grown beyond sustainable resources. To help control this, the government has instated the annual Sort, an event geared towards providing male members of society a chance to sacrifice their lives in an effort to help save the rest of humanity. Two men enter a room and have to make a unanimous decision as to which of them should live. Who will walk out of this room today? Starring: Wesley Cianchette and David Nenner. Continue reading “Review: The Sorting Room”

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Review: Imposter

Written and Directed by Chris Esper, this short film is a silent drama tackling the inner struggles of suffering from anxiety. Starring: Tom Mariano, Brendan Meehan, Sheetal Kelkar, Jamie Braddy, William DeCoff, Adam Masnyk. Esper also directed The Deja Vuers and Undatement Centre. Continue reading “Review: Imposter”

Review: Heartless

Written and directed by Kevin Sluder (@kevin_sluder if you’re Twitter inclined), one half of film-making duo with Jennifer Sluder and Sunshine Boy ProductionsBased on Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Tell-Tale Heart”. An overlooked associate struggles to complete a corporate presentation as a horrific secret gnaws at her conscience. Starring: Stacy Snyder, Joanna Sotomura, Matt Mercer, Blaine Vedros and Ron Morehouse

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Review: Label

Officially titled Aufdruck but for us Brits, Label, written and directed by Jaschar Marktanner. Two young women in their twenties sit in a café and sip coffee out of way too small cups, while smoking an unhealthy amount of cigarettes and talking about everything under the sun and beyond, like aliens…Starring Mary Krasnoperova, Kira Mathis, Steffi Charlotte Flur and writer, director Marktanner himself. Continue reading “Review: Label”

Review: Aimless

Opening on an atmospheric overture, the journey of a relationship gone awry with only our emotional recognition skills to tell us the story and no words to make it too easy for us. As events, or lack thereof as is more accurately the case, unfold the silence continues…until it does not, simple as that. While it lasts you can almost respect the choice not to molly coddle modern audiences as they so often are with today’s cinema, handed everything neatly wrapped and with an overtly explained bow; however, when the dialogue returns it does not have too much to add. The choice to introduce it 15 minutes into the film feels somewhat random, lasting a few scenes but not the entirety; a choice that feels confusing more than anything else. That description is quite possibly a good summation of the film as a whole; a mismatch of styles and directorial choices that don’t always seem to make complete sense. Continue reading “Review: Aimless”